19th Sunday of Ordinary time, cycle C

7th August 2016

The first reading is from a section of the book of Wisdom (18:6-9) which is a reflection on the history of the Old Testament people and the pattern of God’s dealings with us humans. This Old Testament book was written originally in Greek; it is not considered as part of the canon of Scripture by Protestant Churches but is accepted by the Catholic Church; its status is called deutero-canonical – meaning of secondary canonical status. It reads as though God rewards those who are His people and punishes their enemies. This is how the covenant celebrated in the Passover meal, was generally interpreted by the chosen people. Similar ideas seem to show themselves in the psalm that follows the reading (extracts from Psalm 33).

The second reading is from the book of Hebrews (Chapter 11, verses 1-19 omitting the examples of Abel, Enoch and Noah). This writing was in the past referred to as Paul’s letter to the Hebrews, but now is generally recognised as by some unknown Christian authority who focused on the Christian impact and interpretation of the events of the Old Testament. As in all the books of the Bible the chapter divisions are a later addition, so that this reading from the beginning of Chapter 11 flows naturally on from the end of the previous chapter. The opening phrase is well-known in the King James version which reads “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” The illustrations from the O.T. in our reading give some indication of how the author understood the words. Faith can be taken as a personal response, something subjective, rather than an objective reality. Today, in English translations both objective and subjective interpretations are used. I think the word “realisation” would be good; its dictionary definition has three possibilities: i. the act of becoming fully aware of something; ii. the achievement of something; and iii. the conversion of some asset into something useful.

It is most likely that Jesus would have said something about being prepared for a disaster and disappointment as He sensed that He would be arrested due to His outspoken and powerful presence being seen as a threat by both religious leaders and secular authorities. We know that after His death and resurrection there was an expectation of the coming of Christ as judge to establish the kingdom on earth and to share a heavenly banquet with the faithful followers. But Luke (12:32-48)has presented this as a warning addressed to the leaders of the church (the stewards). Their need for readiness uses the phrase ‘gird your loins’ which refers to the tying up of their long robes ready for some physical work and in some translations is rendered “see that you are dressed for action.” Behind what Luke writes there is a parable about this need for preparation and readiness.

 

 

 

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